Archive for National Fisherman

National Fisherman Blogroll: Fishing Families Matter!

If you haven’t checked out the new blogroll at National Fisherman magazine lately, now’s a good time to do so. You’ll see a handful of newly added commercial fishing—industry blogs to check out, including Highliners and Homecomings.

As I considered the inclusion of my bio and photo for the NF blogroll, I felt a bit of panic. Although I’ve written professionally for over ten years, and Highliners and Homecomings has existed for over six years, I felt some personal pressure.

“I need to publish posts more often! All those drafts? Need to edit and publish more quickly!”

I saw the list of blogs also included. Active fishermen and women! Although I come from a multi–generation fishing family and fished several seasons alongside my sisters aboard the family fishing vessel, I don’t fish now.

Now, I’m a mom! A wife!

Do I still count?

Do we count?

I told myself that as soon as my daughter Eva’s birthday celebration was complete, and my son Vincent’s VIP week at school concluded, and baby Valerie recovered from the croup, I would start rolling out posts more quickly.

In a commercial fishing family, however, things rarely go according to plan.

The week of birthday, VIP, and even the croup will pass. But you know what? Other “things” will always come up.

We’ll say hello to the holiday season and goodbye to Dad for the crab season. Art, Jazzercise, choir, homework, writing, doctor appointments, PTA, and likewise will all come a’calling. And like you, my fellow commercial fishing wives and girlfriends, I’ll be tackling these things from shore, often alone.

That’s how I roll and exactly what I write about: Life, one fishing season at a time.

We may not be at sea, and we may not be fishing, but we still count.

Believe it.

Welcome!

The May Issue of National Fisherman: Recognize That Guy On The Cover?

There was plenty of excitement around here for a commercial fishing mommy and her ducklings when the May issue of National Fisherman magazine showed up in the mail yesterday. Hey, that’s Daddy on the cover!

This was a photo of George taken by David Hills in the Gulf of Alaska during the blackcod/halibut season a couple of years ago. David has gone out a couple of times with the boat; once to take pictures during the longline season and once during Dungeneness crab season. I’m excited that his shot made the cover!

Ironically, if you look on page four of the magazine underneath the section “10 Years Ago,” you’ll see a cover shot and profile that I wrote a decade ago on my old stomping grounds of Ketchikan, Alaska. It boggles my mind that I am seeing my cover shots and stories in that section more and more. Ten years ago…before homes, dogs, children, boats…when I traveled up and down the West Coast and Alaska taking pictures and writing stories.

Fortunately, even if I’m currently unable to travel, the Internet has made it possible for me to keep writing and to expand into my current niche as a writer about commercial fishing families. You’ve got to be able to transition and grow and expand as a writer!

Also included in the May issue of National Fisherman are two shots taken by Zed Blue, the husband of my friend and fellow writer, Robin, who blogs about her fishing family at The Fishing Blues.  Zed took the photo on pages 18-19 of the Bering Sea crabbers, and the photo on page 20 of longlining for blackcod.

It was perfect timing that this issue, with a picture of G on the cover during the blackcod/halibut season, arrived just yesterday, because he is heading north in two days to do the same exact thing. Cool send-off for the boat—and maybe, a sign of good luck and a great season ahead.

G gaffing a blackcod during the Alaska blackcod and halibut season. Photo by David Hills (www.fishingpix.net).

Another Great Time at Pacific Marine Expo 2011!

Attending Pacific Marine Expo (also known as Fish Expo) each year is as much a fall tradition in our family as Thanksgiving dinner or choosing a Christmas tree. It is the perfect way for us to kick off the holiday and Dungeness crab seasons, and we always leave the event looking forward to and pumped about all that lies ahead.

This year’s PME brimmed with heightened energy and cheer. There were more vendors than ever, the freebies at each booth were awesome, and almost the entire crew from National Fisherman magazine came out to publish the Show Daily after the show publication was put on hiatus for a couple of years.

I was excited to see the Show Daily back in effect because I have great memories of a decade ago when I ran around the Convention Center with my recorder and notebook, attending PME workshops and listening to speakers, taking notes, then running upstairs to sit down and type it all up into short news bits for the Daily.

I can’t believe what little-to-no-turnover occurs with the editing, publishing, and art gang at National Fisherman. Seriously. Even after ten years, I still see Jerry, Linc, Jen, Michael, and Michael at Fish Expo. These are the original characters that were in place when Jerry Fraser first gave me my fiFrst professional writing gig as a correspondent for the magazine long ago!

So, I feel pretty okay when I see Jerry in the NF booth at PME and make my annual pitch for work I’d like to do or see in the magazine.

“Hey, how’s it going?!” I say. “Great! It’s good! Yep, here’s Eva and Vincent. George is around here somewhere. Yes, Dad’s here, too! I know, crazy, another one on the way, huh? Say, about what we talked about last year, here’s what I was thinking…”

I try Linc next.

“Hey, Linc! Longtime no see! Remember when we ordered those Cosmopolitans years ago? Mmm, those were good. Hey, what do you think about this idea I’ve been working on….?”

I see Jes, who actually took over as senior editor of NF last year.

“Jes! Hi! Great to see you. Magazine looks good! Yep, pregnant! Due in only eight more weeks! Can’t wait! Hey, I wanted to get in touch with you about this thing I’ve been tossing around….”

Then I have a laugh.

“No? Still not interested? That’s okay. I’ll be back again next year!”

We spent all day at PME and saw fishermen we knew, a neighbor or two, a relative, some of George’s longtime/sometime business partners (along with the spec sheet for the new $10 million Bering Sea longliner they’re having built).

We also ran into one of our favorites, Fred Wahl, along with his lovely wife. Of course, Fred Wahl and National Fisherman magazine is how George and I first met. You can read more about that here.

“There they are!” Fred called in our direction when we spotted each other across the aisle. “No strollers this year, eh?” he asked.

That’s when I pointed to my seven-months pregnant tummy.

“Ah!” he said.

The children also had a great time and were incredibly well-behaved. Their first stop was the Xtra Tuff booth, where Eva and Vincent received their free pair of Xtra Tuff boots. They also got t-shirts and red cups at the booth this year, and I came away with two luggage tags made out of my business cards.

George scored a free hooded sweatshirt and ball cap from the Redden Marine Supply booth, I went around collecting tons of pens, and the children collected candy, flashlights, and keychains. George also scooped up lots of tablets with lined paper (including one with his favorite…graph paper!).

The guys at the Toyota Industries booth were especially kind; they let Eva and Vincent sit inside the enclosed forklifts pushing buttons, honking horns, and pulling levers for the better part of an hour. Vincent also had a good time helping the ice-maker demonstration folks pick up renegade ice from the floor.

We spotted a fancy Porsche in the parking garage on our way into the show and again on our way out. “Must be a Deadliest Catch guy,” we said to each other. When I spotted a fellow wearing a Time Bandit jacket during the show, I did wonder for a moment if that Porsche belonged to him!

A great day for all, to be sure. Can’t wait for next year. Even if we’ll be hauling the stroller back out. :)


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Jen’s Friday Favorites

Too many favorites to count this week!! But here goes…


1. Family (and extended family) trip to Vegas!

2. George, the crew, and the boat wrapping up the Dungeness crab season and coming home this weekend.

3.  Eva and Vincent’s spring gymnastics show.

4. Only three more months until I find out if my submission for the 2011 Pacific Northwest Writers Association’s literary contest is a finalist.

5. Registering for the Bloggy Boot Camp! (And thanks to Mom and Dad for babysitting so Mommy can attend!)

6. My upcoming feature story for National Fisherman magazine! Stay tuned for details.

7.  The most hilarious lunch with my parents, sister, and precious baby niece today. Lots of laughs and the best way to spend an afternoon!

8. Everywhere I went in Vegas, I heard Jazzercise music. It made me feel so at home, at ease, pumped up, and ready to roll.

Have a wonderful weekend!!

 

Challenges Last Year, Outcomes This Year

Writing Prompt From the Lady Bloggers Society:

 

Write about a challenge you faced last year. What was the outcome?


When I think back on 2010, two challenges come to mind. The first one is that I could not, even as an active mother and Jazzercise instructor, keep my weight where I wanted. For years and years I felt great and confident, even after giving birth. After giving birth and nursing two children back-to-back, I reached and maintained my lowest weight ever and felt good.

Unfortunately, after I stopped nursing and grew a few years older, things crept up on me.

The second challenge was George being gone for way too long last year. Now, I am a tough girl and, having four generations before me, was more than ready to take on the commercial fishing life. For Pete’s sake, I am the daughter, grand-daughter, niece, great-niece of commercial fishermen and was writing for National Fisherman magazine when I met my husband.

Even so, G was gone too long last year, and that was a challenge for both of us.

As for the results to my challenges….

When I recently discovered that my calorie-counting and heart rate-tracking Polar Watch was dead, I ordered a similar watch to replace it. (Yes, I could have replaced the battery in the original watch, but I don’t know who replaces batteries in this town and it seemed simpler to order a new one!) I’m also signing up for Jazzercise Boot Camp in addition to my regular Jazzercise classes.

As for George being gone too long?

Only he can handle that end. I am so, so glad we had a lot of time together this fall and over Christmas. It means everything to me and we’ve had an unbelievable time. I hope that his Dungeness crab season is a success and that catching the halibut and blackcod quota goes much more quickly than last year. If it goes slow, I hope he will take a break and come home to visit at some point or let us meet him where he is.



Send Spike Walker a Card & Encouragement

I recently wrote an article for National Fisherman magazine (December 2010) regarding the communication, support, and networking that takes place among the commercial fishing community on Facebook. I wrote about how we all, from West Coast to East Coast, have the ability to communicate through Facebook friendships, groups, causes, and pages.

This morning, I found out via Facebook that one of my writing mentors and the inspiration behind The Deadliest Catch (and my primary source for a National Fisherman feature on the Elbow Room bar), Spike Walker, just suffered a massive heart attack.

Many of you just saw Spike at Pacific Marine Expo signing copies of his brand new book.

Commercial Fisherman’s Festival, a group on Facebook, posted the original notice about Spike’s health and also provided the address to which you can send Spike a get well card. Here is part of the original message:

Commercial Fishermen’s Festival

My long time good buddy and famous author who wrote the book that inspired Deadliest Catch (Working on the Edge) Spike Walker recently suffered a heart attack that came close to taking his life. He is doing well but sounds weak but grateful to be alive. He’s recovering in a hospital….

Get well cards can be mailed directly to Spike at the hospital. Send me a comment if you want the address to send the kind and generous Spike Walker some encouragement.

Ten Years Later and Going Strong.

Ten years ago, I sat on the floor of my bedroom on a dark and wintry December evening, poring over several back issues of National Fisherman magazine that focused on boat building. I was preparing for the latest assignment I’d taken as a freelance writer for National Fisherman. It was an assignment for which I did not feel qualified; the building of the 2.5 million dollar fishing vessel, Shemya, at Fred Wahl Marine Construction.

I’d written a few short articles and one large feature for National Fisherman in the seven months since I’d started writing for the magazine, but I knew next to nothing about building boats. For my first feature, I’d convinced a longtime fishing family friend, Ryan, to take me out to sea on his vessel for a story on the sardine fishery out of Astoria, Oregon.

While very familiar with fishing, having grown up in a fishing family and fishing myself in Southeast Alaska for several summers, I was not schooled in the art of boat building. And this time,  I’d be interviewing strangers, not friends. I decided I’d better refresh myself on basic terms before I could even hope to conduct a coherent interview.

I called Dad.

Dad had commissioned the building of his own boat a decade earlier, and I figured he could give me a crash course on the subject.

“Hull plating?” I asked.

“The steel on the outside of the boat,” Dad answered.

“Keel?”

“The vertical piece of steel at the bottom of the boat, the center of the boat. The backbone of the boat.”

“Stem?”

“The bow of the boat at center line.”

I had no idea what that last one meant, but I kept going.

“Bulkhead?”

“The partition between two different areas of the boat. A wall. It separates the boat into compartments.”

“Power train?”

“The engine, reduction gear, shaft. And the prop.”

“Prop…?” I asked.

Propeller,” Dad answered.

I’m not sure, but I think I began to detect the faintest note of weariness in Dad’s voice. I knew Dad was proud of my work for National Fisherman; after all, it was he who’d first suggested I try my hand at writing for the magazine and encouraged me to contact the editor, Jerry Fraser.

I worried, though, if I’d be able to pull this one off. Had Michael Crowley, the Boats and Gear editor, made a mistake? What would Fred Wahl think of a young lady coming down to Reedsport to interview him on the state-of-the art Shemya? Would I end up inadvertently insulting everyone and making a fool out of myself?

Of course, we all know how the story ended.

I wound up marrying the partner/captain that I interviewed that afternoon at the boatyard, and the rest is history. And ten years since we met (and added two kids, two dogs, one fishing vessel, one blog and a truck or two), I love that all the original players are still in the game.

The following are pictures of all the fellows (taken at this year’s Pacific Marine Expo) who had confidence that I could pull off a story out of my comfort zone, had patience with me as I did my work, and who mean so much to us a decade later.

At least, they mean a lot to me.

As George went around Fish Expo shaking hands with these guys–all of whom played a part in our meeting and eventual marriage–his greeting was accompanied by these words:

“I don’t know whether to shake your hand or give you a right hook.”

My dad, who said "You can do it."

The subject of my first feature for NF, Ryan. Also his sweet wife, Jenny, who was a player in my most recent feature for NF. And of course, G and me...holding a wine glass at a recent party.

Jerry, the Editor in Chief who gave me a chance at writing, Michael Crowley, who sent me on my first boat building story, and Jes, the new Editor in Chief of National Fisherman.

Mike Lee of Fred Wahl Marine Construction, who ten years ago answered my questions, gave me a spec sheet and a tour of the Shemya...all without letting on whether he wondered if this girl had any idea what she was doing.

The man himself, Fred Wahl, who made the official introduction between my future husband and me.

Ten years later...

A Tremendous Pacific Marine Expo 2010!

My family and I attended 2010 Pacific Marine Expo yesterday and had an incredible afternoon. Vincent slept through the first two hours of the event but rallied in time to enjoy a chocolate dipped sugar cookie in the shape of a salmon and to collect a few pens and candy.

Eva was a trooper the entire afternoon and even wore her own badge this year as we traveled up and down aisles, said hello to a ton of people and collected vendor goodies.

We really scored this year. Among our take were two nice-looking John Deere baseball caps, a frisbee, child sunglasses, foam killer whale toys, pencils, pens, pencil sharpeners, bike reflectors, yo yos, fish key chain clip-ons, cute little stuffed frogs, insulated beer bottle holders, and bumper stickers from Commercial Fishermen of America and National Fisherman magazine.

We had three generations with us (Dad, George and me, Eva and Vincent) and we all thoroughly enjoyed ourselves. George and I saw all our old friends (the gang from National Fisherman and Fred Wahl Marine Construction), Dad saw a ton of fishermen he knows, and both George and Dad ran into their maritime accountant.

Oh, how could I forget the biggest score of all? Xtra Tuff was giving away FREE boots to all children! The only deal was the children had to wear them around Fish Expo while they were there. It was too cute seeing all of these little girls and boys with their Xtra Tuffs on! One lady was so very disappointed her young one wasn’t there to receive a pair that we handed over Vincent’s new boots, then trotted him through the booth again wearing a slightly different outfit and accompanied by a different parent.

Anyway, the Events Center was absolutely packed with vendors, extremely smiley attendees, and the energy was contagious. I’m so glad the 2010 Pacific Marine Expo was a success. I hope you enjoy a few of my pictures. I decided to ignore the large sign that clearly stated NO PHOTOGRAPHY so I could remember the day in detail.

I’m working on a separate post that will include my pictures of our National Fisherman and Fred Wahl Marine Construction friends. Stay tuned.

Eva proudly displaying her badge.

My girl loves to pose.

Vincent still sleeping...

Grandpa and Eva.

Thanks for the free boots, Xtra Tuff!

Vincent still sleeping...

Daddy, Sleeping Vincent, Posing Eva.

Three Generations.

Hooray for Grandpa, Pacific Marine Expo, and Free Boots!

Vincent's Awake!!

National Fisherman's Jerry Fraser with George and Dad.

After The Commercial Fishing Homecoming Honeymoon

Whew. What a whirlwind today! The past two weeks, actually.

Our friend, Terry, asked us during dinner last Friday just how long George had been home.

I looked at George and said “About four days, right, hon?”

“No,” he said.

“That’s not right,” said Kim, Terry’s wife.

“How long then?” I asked George and Kim.

“A couple of weeks I think,” said G.

“Ten days at least,” said Kim.

Well, I’ve lost all track of time.

This most recent transition from sea to shore and boat to home has gone well. It normally does not go quite this easily. The first two or three days are always bliss, but towards the end of the first week, things go back to normal.

“Well, that was fun,” George always says when the honeymoon is clearly over.

This time, however, we’ve only had one moment of strain since being back together after months apart.

“How’s it going?” asked my friend, Beth. “Still in the honeymoon?”

I can’t repeat exactly what I wrote in my e-mail reply, but I did describe one less-than-loving moment we may have experienced since G’s arrival home. Something to do with purposely letting the door close on someone, sending someone off with a less-than-friendly farewell, and perhaps a choice follow-up text or two.

You have to get it out of your system! Fortunately, it was quick and painless.

This time.

My parents were wonderful enough to volunteer–no, insist–on having our little ones spend the night at their house while G and I went on our first ever all-night date night last week. We had a magical and hilarious time with our close friends at dinner, the theater comedy show, and even with my own sister and her boyfriend after the show. (BTW, sorry about leaving you with the tab! How much do we owe?)

This morning, I received an e-mail from an editor at National Fisherman magazine asking if the article I’d pitched a month or so back was ready to submit in time for the awesome Pacific Marine Expo Issue.

YIKES!

No, it wasn’t.

Always up for a challenge and not wanting to miss out on one of the biggest issues of the year, I sat down today, gathered my notes, and actually had a wonderful time putting together an article I’ve been wanting to write for a long time.

Cross your fingers that it passes inspection. And if does, and you are at Pacific Marine Expo in Seattle at the end of November, look for it in the front of National Fisherman magazine!

 

Eva's First Fish

 

 

Vincent's Favorite Past Time

 

“Author Mama” by Christina Katz

When I was a younger gal, I decided that writing was the career/hobby/passion for me. I’d been a lifelong journal writer and reader of all books from the word go. I chose English Literature as my major in college simply because it combined two of my primary interests: Reading and Writing.

After college, my dad encouraged me to reach out to a magazine from whom I ended up getting an incredibly lucky break: National Fisherman and its editor, Jerry Fraser. I got to travel up and down the West Coast and Alaska writing about a subject I knew and cared a lot about: commercial fishing.

I met my husband while on assignment for National Fisherman, and we started a family as soon as we could. We also bought my family’s multi-generation commercial fishing business. I was busy! New husband, new mom, new business.

Goodbye, writing!

Until, that is, I saw a notice in my local paper that Christina Katz, author of Writer Mama: How to Raise a Writing Career Alongside Your Kids, was speaking at a local bookstore that night.

Seven months pregnant and a one-year-old in my arms, I attended that reading. I began taking classes, reading, and listening to any and all advice Christina had to offer. I’ve come to find out that Christina Katz is many things: bold, fun, friendly, smart, honest, and helpful.

The following is an interview with Christina Katz regarding her latest creation, an e-book called “Author Mama.”

An Interview with Christina Katz About Author Mama

April 2010

Why would you do an e-book after two traditionally published books? Why did you decide to write an e-book?

Like most traditionally published authors, who blog, teach and speak, I have a backlog of quality content to draw on and some of it, though not all of it, will lend itself to the e-book format. So I plan to write several e-books over time and Author Mama is the first. I have old sketchbooks full of ideas I’ve had over the years, which will lend themselves well to e-formats. Equal opportunity access to e-publishing technology offers all of us writers a lot more creative leeway than we have traditionally had, which can lead to exciting and fun possibilities.

Besides being in e-book format, how is Author Mama different from Writer Mama and Get Known Before the Book Deal?

Author Mama is the story behind how I landed my book deal for Writer Mama and then wrote the book. I wanted to describe in play-by-play form what writing a non-fiction book is like for the benefit of moms considering the possibility with the lessons I learned along the way. One of my students who is on the verge of querying agents with a nonfiction book proposal says that Author Mama “goes there.” In other words, it deals squarely with the rollercoaster ride that most first-time authors experience. The format of my traditionally published books is not as driven by my personal experience, even though it informs them both. In Author Mama, I include all of the books that I recommend first-time authors read before, during, and after the book deal, so they can become as informed and empowered as possible.

Who are the intended readers for Author Mama?

Well, my two traditionally published books don’t target the same exact audience and neither does Author Mama. When I wrote Author Mama, I had my Writer Mama readers in mind, but of those readers, I was specifically focused on anyone seriously considering writing a book someday. Not every writer mama wants to write a book someday. Some are perfectly happy writing and publishing articles. So Author Mama is a slice (a writing book), of a slice (for moms), of a slice (who are considering becoming an author some day), and therefore too small of an audience for a traditional publisher. But many of my students and fans have this question and would like to answer it for themselves. Author Mama is for them.

Did you have any hesitations about self-publishing?

Considering how much content I have sitting around languishing on my hard drives, I am sorry that it’s taken me this long. The person I had the hardest time convincing was myself. I’ve had some hang-ups about e-books that I’ve had to get over in order to move forward. As long as my work continues to serve the best interests of my readers, why wouldn’t I self-publish? I certainly have a lot more to offer than I would just letting it sit around collecting virtual dust. At this point in time, I feel like it would be foolish not to e-publish, even as I continue to write traditional books.

Are publishers anxious about traditional authors self-publishing? Doesn’t this undermine their business?

I think, when it comes to self-publishing the opportunity always exists to take the enlightened view or the fearful view. I have heard people in publishing make comments that authors self-publishing is terrible news, which is absurd. The fearful attitude is, “Oh no, if that author can self-publish, then we lose.” The enlightened view is that when the people you partner with are more successful it’s good for you too because it raises all boats. Besides, when all the folks involved in a partnership are empowered and come together because they want to be there, that’s good for the relationship. It’s important to have good boundaries and communication in business and know the difference between what’s yours, what’s not yours, and what is joint ownership. When you keep these things in mind, and communicate clearly, there is really nothing to fear but fear itself.

How do you keep people from “stealing” your e-book?

I can’t stop people from stealing my e-book. I am completely powerless over that aspect of e-publishing, as most of us are. However, my target audience is not teenage boys and young men, who are supposedly the folks who do most of the pirating, according to the experts who study these trends. So I’m not going to lose any sleep over it. Also I don’t plan on giving my e-books away to avoid the impression that they are “freebies,” whereas with a traditional book I always do a lot of giveaways to get the content out into circulation. E-books are a lot easier to circulate. I can send one to you in seconds. So at this time, I don’t see the point in giving them away and encouraging others to share them without permission. I’d prefer to sell them to a smaller, more exclusive audience, who will see the value and, hopefully, respect my copyright.

What are three major points you hope aspiring writers learn from reading Author Mama?

That landing a traditional book deal and delivering a well-written book is possible but not easy by any means.

That someone else has survived the rollercoaster of emotions that come part and parcel with a first traditional book deal and you can too.

That some writers actually give up along the way and don’t succeed at delivering their first book but this won’t happen to the writers who read Author Mama because forewarned is forearmed.

Is this book only for nonfiction writers or can fiction writers benefit from it too?

Author Mama is specifically about my nonfiction book writing process, which is different from the process for other genres like fiction or memoir. However, a lot of my readers, who write in other genres, have said over the years that they find a lot of takeaways in my nonfiction experience. Also, I fully expect Author Mama to convince a few readers to try writing a nonfiction book, who might have only considered themselves other types of writers or not even writers at all.

Can I order a print copy of Author Mama?

When the book comes out in the final version in May, I will make it available for purchase in print-on-demand format, as well as all the other e-formats. During April, while it’s in beta, Author Mama is available in PDF format, which means you can print it out and put it in a binder yourself, if you prefer a hard copy. I’ve invited the first readers to participate in the process, so I’ve included a feedback form with the e-book but participation is voluntary. However to sweeten the deal, I will provide those who share feedback on the beta version with the final version for free, after it’s updated in PDF form.

How can I order this e-book for someone as a gift?

Sure you can. When you place your order, simply submit their e-mail address in the notes section and I will e-mail the copy to them instead of to you.

Thanks for your questions about Author Mama. If you’d like to learn more, please visit http://christinakatz.com.

About Christina Katz, The Author Mama

Christina Katz has been teaching writers to cultivate thriving careers for the past decade. Many of her students start by writing short articles and work hard and long until they eventually succeed in landing traditional book deals. Christina is the author of Get Known Before the Book Deal, Use Your Personal Strengths to Grow an Author Platform and Writer Mama, How to Raise A Writing Career Alongside Your Kids, both from Writer’s Digest Books.

In addition to writing books and articles, Christina publishes a weekly e-zine, The Prosperous Writer, hosts The Northwest Author Series, travels to writing conferences and literary events, and coaches a hundred writers a year. She holds an MFA in writing from Columbia College Chicago and a BA from Dartmouth College. She lives in an idyllic cottage in Wilsonville, Oregon with her husband, daughter and far too many pets.

Keep up with Christina, if you can, at www.christinakatz.com.